Wednesday, September 29, 2010

When Dylan met Obama

I really love this part from Obama's new interview with Rollingstone where he talks about meeting Bob Dylan at the Whitehouse tribute to songs of the Civil Rights era.

Here’s what I love about Dylan: He was exactly as you’d expect he would be. He wouldn’t come to the rehearsal; usually, all these guys are practicing before the set in the evening. He didn’t want to take a picture with me; usually all the talent is dying to take a picture with me and Michelle before the show, but he didn’t show up to that. He came in and played “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” A beautiful rendition. The guy is so steeped in this stuff that he can just come up with some new arrangement, and the song sounds completely different. Finishes the song, steps off the stage… comes up, shakes my hand, sort of tips his head, gives me just a little grin, and then leaves… That was our only interaction with him. And I thought: That’s how you want Bob Dylan, right? You don’t want him to be all cheesin’ and grinnin’ with you. You want him to be a little skeptical about the whole enterprise.

And here is that performance:

What The Future Sounded Like

Documentary about the the people of EMS (Electronic Music Studios) a radical group of avant-garde electronic musicians who utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic electronic sound-scape for the New Britain.
Comprising of pioneering electronic musicians Peter Zinovieff and Tristram Cary (famed for his work on the Dr Who series) and genius engineer David Cockerell, EMSs studio was one of the most advanced computer-music facilities in the world. EMSs great legacy is the VCS3, Britains first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 changed the sounds of some of the most popular artists of this period including Brian Eno, Hawkwind and Pink Floyd.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Wish LIst: The Star Trek Pizza Cutter

Boldy cut pizza where no man has cut before!

Space… the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new pizzas, to seek out new toppings and new cheeses, to boldy cut pizza where no man has cut before! Yes, this officially licensed Star Trek collectable is everything you hoped it would be. Laser etched stainless steel blade and solid metal construction make it perfect for battling Romulans in the neutral zone or precision pizza slicing.

You’ll find that even though the prime mission of the Enterprise has now become very pizza centric, the chrome plated metal construction and padded gift box make the Enterprise pizza cutter a true Star Trek collectable. Plus it looks great on your desk even when not being used to cut your favorite cheese and sauce laden foods.

Trespass: A History of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Graffiti and unsanctioned art—from local origins to global phenomenon

In recent years street art has grown bolder, more ornate, more sophisticated and—in many cases—more acceptable. Yet unsanctioned public art remains the problem child of cultural expression, the last outlaw of visual disciplines. It has also become a global phenomenon of the 21st century.

Made in collaboration with featured artists, Trespass examines the rise and global reach of graffiti and urban art, tracing key figures, events and movements of self-expression in the city’s social space, and the history of urban reclamation, protest, and illicit performance. The first book to present the full historical sweep, global reach and technical developments of the street art movement, Trespass features key works by 150 artists, and connects four generations of visionary outlaws including Jean Tinguely, Spencer Tunick, Keith Haring, Os Gemeos, Jenny Holzer, Barry McGee, Gordon Matta-Clark, Shepard Fairey, Blu, Billboard Liberation Front, Guerrilla Girls and Banksy, among others. It also includes dozens of previously unpublished photographs of long-lost works and legendary, ephemeral urban artworks.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Douglas Coupland's New Terms For New Sensations

Airport-Induced Identity Dysphoria: Describes the extent to which modern travel strips the traveller of just enough sense of identity so as to create a need to purchase stickers and gift knick-knacks that bolster their sense of slightly eroded personhood: flags of the world, family crests, school and university merchandise.

Anti-Fluke: A situation in the universe in which rigid rules of action exist to prevent coincidences from happening. Given the infinite number of coincidences that could happen, very few ever actually do. The universe exists in a coincidence-hating state of anti-fluke.

Bell's Law of Telephony: No matter what technology is used, your monthly phone bill magically remains about the same size.

Blank-Collar Workers: Formerly middle-class workers who will never be middle-class again and who will never come to terms with that.

Christmas-Morning Feeling: A sensation created by stimulus to the anterior amygdala that leaves one with a strong sense of expectation. (See also Godseeking).

Cloud Blindness: The inability of some people to see faces or shapes in clouds.

Complex Separation: The theory that, in music, a song gets only one chance to make a first impression. After that the brain starts breaking it down, subdividing the musical experience into its various components – lyrical, melodic and so forth.

Cover Buzz: The sensation felt when hearing a cover version of a song one already knows.

Crystallographic Money Theory: The hypothesis that money is a crystallization or condensation of time and free will, the two characteristics that separate humans from other species.

Denarration: The process whereby one's life stops feeling like a story.

Deselfing: Willingly diluting one's sense of self and ego by plastering the internet with as much information as possible. (See also Omniscience Fatigue; Undeselfing)

Dimanchophobia: Fear of Sundays, a condition that reflects fear of unstructured time. Also known as acalendrical anxiety. Not to be confused with didominicaphobia or kyriakephobia, fear of the Lord's Day.

Fictive Rest: The inability of many people to fall asleep until after reading even the tiniest amount of fiction.

Frankentime: What time feels like when you realise that most of your life is spent working with and around a computer and the internet.

Godseeking: An extreme version of Christmas Morning Feeling.

Grim Truth: You're smarter than TV. So what?

Ikeasis: The desire in daily life and consumer life to cling to "generically" designed objects. This need for clear, unconfusing forms is a means of simplifying life amid an onslaught of information.

Instant Reincarnation: The fact that most adults, no matter how great their life is, wish for radical change in their life. The urge to reincarnate while still alive is near universal.

Intravincular Familial Silence: We need to be around our families not because we have so many shared experiences to talk about, but because they know precisely which subjects to avoid.

Humanalai: Things made by humans that exist only on Earth and nowhere else in the universe. Examples include: Teflon, NutraSweet, Paxil and meaningfully sized chunks of element No. 43, technetium.

Internal Voice Blindness: The near universal inability of people to articulate the tone and personality of the voice that forms their interior monologue.

Interruption-Driven Memory: We remember only red traffic lights, never the green ones. The green ones keep us in the flow, the red ones interrupt and annoy us.

Intraffinital Melancholy vs Extraffinital Melancholy: Which is lonelier: To be single and lonely, or to be lonely within a dead relationship?

Karaokeal Amnesia: Most people don't know all the lyrics to almost any song, particularly the ones they hold most dear. (See also Lyrical Putty)

Limited Pool Romantic Theory: The belief that there is a finite number of times in which one can fall in love, most commonly six.

Lyrical Putty: The lyrics one creates in one's head in the absence of knowing a song's real lyrics.

Malfactory Aversion: The ability to figure out what it is in life you don't do well, and then to stop doing it.

Me Goggles: The inability to accurately perceive oneself as others do.

Memesphere: The realm of culturally tangible ideas.

Omniscience Fatigue: The burn-out that comes with being able to know the answer to almost anything online.

Post-Human: Whatever it is that we become next.

Proceleration: The acceleration of acceleration.

Pseudoalienation: The inability of humans to create genuinely alienating situations. Anything made by humans is a de facto expression of humanity. Technology cannot be alienating because humans created it. Genuinely alien technologies can be created only by aliens. Technically, a situation one might describe as alienating is, in fact, "humanating".

Rosenwald's Theorem: The belief that all the wrong people have self-esteem.

Situational Disinhibition: Social contrivances within which one is allowed to become disinhibited, that is, moments of culturally approved disinhibition: when speaking with fortunetellers, to dogs and other pets, to strangers and bartenders in bars, or with Ouija boards.

Standard Deviation: Feeling unique is no indication of uniqueness, and yet it is the feeling of uniqueness that convinces us we have souls.

Star Shock: The disproportionate way that meeting celebrities feels slightly like being told a piece of life-changing news.

Stovulax: A micro-targeted drug of the future designed to stop fantastically specific OCD cases, in this case a compulsion involving the inability of some people to convince themselves, after leaving the house, that the stove is turned off.

Undeselfing: The attempt, usually frantic and futile, to reverse the deselfing process.

Zoosumnial Blurring: The notion that animals probably don't see much difference between dreaming and being awake.

Via The Independent

Monday, September 20, 2010

Philip K. Dick Documentary by the BBC

A Day in the Afterlife focuses on the man himself, in all his crazy, drug-addled, paranoid glory. The mind behind some of my favorite books is fascinated by the constant bombardment of advertising, the effects of giant media conglomerates, and the overwhelming feeling that the world in which we live exists only in the glowing vacuum tubes of countless television sets. It is an ode to one of the most creative minds in science fiction, and another step in the crusade for a wider recognition of his accomplishments.” Ross Rosenberg

Via. Dangerous Minds

Sunday, September 19, 2010

The Birth of Chewbacca

“I think I just ran over something back there, I think I ran over a wookie”. This is the first emergence of the word Wookiee as we know it today. And the small wookies in THX who lived in the shell of this environment became the large wookiee that we all know in Star Wars. […]

“And later on after the recording I asked Terry ‘What’s the Wookie?’ and he said ‘Oh that’s a friend of mine who lives in Texas, Ralph Wookie, and I just threw his name in there as I always want to stick it to him and thought he’d get a kick out of hearing his name in a film’. Little did Terry know what kind of thing he was creating, this off-hand phrase has since become a character that literally billions of people probably know about.”

Via Nerdcore

Saturday, September 18, 2010

More Awesomeness From Roa

Jeez this guy is just killing it lately. Those boat pieces are some serious next level stuff.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Marky Ramone Pasta Sauce

“It may sound corny, but I’ve got this pasta sauce coming out called ‘Marky Ramone’s Brooklyn’s Own Pasta Sauce’,” says Ramone.

Being able to market his own brand of sauce holds great sentimental value for the Punk Rocker.

“You see, I made it with my grandpa; he was a chef at 21 Club. I watched him as a little boy, and then when I got older, I lived alone at 18, and so pasta sauce and spaghetti was the cheapest thing around,” says Ramone. “I got really good at making it, and so I am excited I get to share my recipe with others. And I got to do the artwork on bottle, and it’s really cool looking. Soon it will be sold in stores; right now you can only get it online and in restaurants.”

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Devo Christ

More Devo goodness.

Lost William S. Burroughs Graphic Novel Looks Amazing

Ah Pook Is Here first appeared in 1970 under the title The Unspeakable Mr. Hart as a monthly comic strip written by Burroughs and drawn by the British cartoonist and painter Malcolm McNeil in the English magazine Cyclops. When the publication folded, Burroughs and McNeill decided to develop the project into a full-length, Word/Image novel (the term “graphic novel” had not yet been coined). Burroughs was 56 at the time, McNeill 23.

The book was conceived as a single painting in which text and images were combined in whatever form seemed appropriate to the narrative. It was conceived as 120 continuous pages that would “fold out.” Such a book was, at the time, unprecedented, and no publisher was willing to take a chance and publish a “graphic novel.” Burroughs and McNeill finally abandoned the project after collaborating on it for 7 years.

“It is singularly appropriate that after championing literate comics and the graphic novel form for over 30 years, Fantagraphics Books should bring a literary collaboration between one of America’s most distinctive writers and his exemplary hand-chosen artist to light,” says Fantagraphics Publisher and acquiring editor Gary Groth.

Sunday, September 12, 2010

Wookie the Chew by James Hance

These cool illustrations by James Hance re imagine the Star Wars characters as A.A. Milane's Winnie The Pooh. See more of James Hance's work here.

The Worlds Oldest Living Organisms

Rachel Sussman shows photographs of the world’s oldest continuously living organisms — from 2,000-year-old brain coral off Tobago’s coast to an “underground forest” in South Africa that has lived since before the dawn of agriculture

Saturday, September 11, 2010

The Cry Of Jazz: Race and Music in 1959

Jazz is dead because the experience and suffering of American life on the Negro have to die. The spirit of jazz is alive because the Negro’s spirit must endure.

—Alex, from The Cry of Jazz

Found over at Dangerous Minds.

Friday, September 10, 2010

Detroit Lives

Via. Palladium:

Once the fourth-largest metropolis in America—some have called it the Death of the American Dream. Today, the young people of the Motor City are making it their own DIY paradise where rules are second to passion and creativity. They are creating the new Detroit on their own terms, against real adversity. We put our boots on and went exploring.

Atheist Billboard in Oklahoma

In a state where 8 out of 10 citizens describe themselves as Christians this is bound to piss some people off. But considering how many religious billboards, ads, mailers and TV shows those of us who are unbelievers are subjected to I think they can suck it up.

Grand Prix Posters by Michael Turner

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Batman VS. The Ecstasy Killer

In 1988, DC Comics released a Batman issue of the Detective Comics series where the primary villain is a young man who is given ecstasy and then goes on a killing rampage. The secondary villain is the ecstasy dealer / pusher who gives the young man the drug. This comic represents some of the absurdist “Just Say No” propaganda common in the late 1980′s and is an amusing piece of War on Drugs memorobilia. This comic also represents an interesting piece of history because it came somewhat after the first crest of media frenzy about MDMA. By 1988, the “designer drug” hysteria had been mostly drowned out by the “Crack Epidemic” scare. When Ecstasy fear mongering was reinvented in 1998-1999, the previous wave of anti-ecstasy media was all but forgotten.

Via: Boing Boing

New Print From Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey's Arctic National Wildlife Refuse 50Th Anniversary Print.

Vintage Norton Motorcycles Ads

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Lakai - Skate & Create

Stephen Powers Brings Love Letters to Syracuse

Via. Unurth:

Powers’ hand-painted signs draw on years of his own work as a painter and graffiti artist, but also on a long tradition of making, advertising, and handcrafting. Coming to Syracuse, a city that exemplifies the model mid-size, post-industrial rustbelt city under reinvention, is part of a national movement of change, a Rustbelt Renaissance, driven by a creative economy.

“The goal of the project is to ultimately bridge the Near Westside community to downtown, which will give access to new markets and resources for residents in the neighborhood,” says Maarten Jacobs, director of the Near Westside Initiative.

Monday, September 6, 2010

Wish List: Star Wars Manager Coat by Adidas

adidas x Star Wars collection

- Football manager jacket inspired by the Wookies
- Faux fur hood and cuffs
- Concealed zipper with snap buttons
- Inside print of Chewbacca
- Main body: 100% cotton twill, quilted

Ugly Las Vegas Casino Carpets

Via. Wired:

Mathematician-philosopher Alfred North Whitehead once said, “It requires a very unusual mind to undertake the analysis of the obvious.” This certainly rings true with Chris Maluszynski’s Las Vegas Carpets series, whose name explains it all. The photos draw out the psychology of Las Vegas through the simple observation of carpet.

Years ago, while in Las Vegas covering the World Series of Poker, Maluszynski found himself as enraptured by the drama unfolding below the tables as above them. Originally from Sweden, now based in New York, Maluszynski spent four years roaming Sin City’s kaleidoscopic corridors with his camera.

“The carpets definitely play a big part in keeping the town as surreal as it is,” said Maluszynski by e-mail. “Thought has been given to the carpeting by people who want to create this special atmosphere, [one] that defines Vegas as a gambling city.”